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Hi I'm Olivia

Do you want to take your playing to the next level but feel like it’s never going to happen?

You have music in you that you want to express freely but you don’t know how to make it a reality?

I did, but for the longest time, I believed the only way I could achieve that was practicing long hours and being hard on myself.

However, I was wrong.

This is my story

Ever since I was a child, I wanted to become a great violinist.

 

I practiced diligently and logged as many hours as I could in the practice room, believing that the only way that I could get better at violin was practicing longer and doing more repetitions.

I majored in performance in college and met a friend who studied with the same teacher as me. She did not spend that much time in the practice room—one or maybe two hours a day.

 

One day, she performed in our studio class - a form of a performance class where the students from the same teacher’s studio gathered and performed for each other for feedback.

Everyone was speechless because she had learned the whole piece in just two weeks and it was perfectly memorized and technically flawless.

 

Our professor asked how she did it and with confusion on her face, she replied, “umm…pay attention?”

“What does that even mean?” I thought. I wanted to be just like her but I could not figure out how she could learn so quickly while practicing so little simply by “paying attention.” I was left utterly confused.

 

Then one day, I had a revelation.

 

I realized that I had kept telling myself "I have to be better. I’m not good enough. I have to work harder," but I never asked myself, “What is my goal and how can I get there? What is the problem and what can I do right now to fix it?”

I was so busy criticizing myself that I was not paying attention to what was happening when I practiced.

I thought I needed more self-criticism and hard work but what I really needed was goals, plan and action.

 

I needed to embrace my playing with the flaws and all, envision what it can be, figure out the steps to get there and focus on doing it.

 

Only then, I could overcome my insecurities and limiting beliefs and move forward with confidence and joy.

For over a decade afterward, I dedicated myself to doing just that.

 

With the help of wonderful mentors and teachers, I learned how to analyze good performance and set a specific goal, come up with practice strategies, and be focused and present when executing those strategies without mindless repetition or destructive criticism.

 

I applied this method to improve my own playing, learned to teach others, and taught students of all ages.

It worked.

 

I was able to learn new pieces quickly for myself and my students were successful. They were able to listen, learn, and practice effectively.

 

They felt confident and empowered to tackle new challenges, knowing that they had all the tools that they needed.

Many people believe that practice makes perfect—that they need to spend hours and hours on repetition in order to get better at playing an instrument.

 

It is true that repetition and discipline are an essential part of learning; however, they are only part of learning.

In order to make significant changes in your playing, gain confidence, and manifest your music through violin, you need to work on setting a clear goal, having a clear plan, and taking clear action in a supportive environment.

 

Without it, self-criticism and hard work alone just lead to frustration, disappointment and burnout, which blocks you from reaching your full potential and enriching your life and the lives of your families and friends with music.

Over the years, I have had a number of adults in my studio. I was able to help them gain confidence and support that they needed to overcome their challenges.

However, I felt the limitation of the traditional once-a-week lesson setup at a typical music school environment.

I have seen so many adult violin players with great passion and love for music feel isolated and unsupported once they go home after their weekly lesson.

They feel self-conscious and out of place in music schools because the program is not tailored to them.

Let’s face it, learning to play an instrument is hard enough. You do not need this extra layer of stress.

What you need is knowing how to set a clear goal, have a clear plan and take clear action, and surround yourself in a supportive environment so you can learn effectively, play with confidence and make your melody come true.

This is why I designed a 6-month online program for adult players and I am so excited to share my knowledge and experience to help you take your playing to the next level and share the joy of music with your families, friends and the communities you serve.

If any of this resonates with you and you want to know more about it so you can reach your goals and move forward with confidence, joy and ease, book a call with me now. We will discuss your goals, challenges and the next best action step for you to become the violinist of your dreams. 

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